Updated April 3rd 2010 21:45z

 

HOMEPAGE OF VE3FAL

QRP IS NOT FOR SISSIES

YOU CAN DO SO MUCH WITH SO LITTLE


 

Hello and welcome to my homepage, thanks for stopping in. My name is Fred Lesnick, my amateur radio call sign is VE3FAL, and I live in Thunder Bay, Ontario. My grid square is EN58hh.

Radio has been a hobby of mine for many years, and every hour that I spend playing radio is rewarding. My favorite digital mode is C.W. (Morse code) , yes, C.W.. Some of the other modes I enjoy are:

Slow Scan TV (S.S.T.V) , Radio Teletype (R.T.T.Y) , PSK , Satellites , APRS , Moon Bounce and Meteor Scatter.

Here are some of my favorite links:

Buddipole Homepage: http://www.buddipole.com/

Solar Weather Website: http://dx.qsl.net/propagation/

NA6E Website: http://www.qsl.net/na6e/  (God Bless you Mary, you were a great friend)

K6DF Website: http://www.qsl.net/k6df/index.html

DX Summit:  http://www.dxsummit.fi/DxSpots.aspx

Radio World: http://www.radioworld.ca/

Durham Radio Sales: http://www.durhamradio.com

Radio Amateurs Of Canada: http://www.rac.ca/

Northern Lights Radio Society: http://www.nlrs.org

Central States VHF Society: http://www.csvhfs.org/

QRP ARCI Webpage: http://www.qrparci.org/

Eastern Pennsylvania QRP Club: http://www.n3epa.org/

How Far Is It (Distance Calculator): http://www.indo.com/distance/

6 Metres: http://www.6mt.com/

Numbers Stations: http://www.spynumbers.com/

Small Wonder Labs: http://www.smallwonderlabs.com/

QRP Homebuilders Page: http://www.qrp.pops.net/

Canadian Hurricane Centre: http://www.ec.gc.ca/ouraganshurricanes/default.asp?lang=En&n=DA74FE64-1

H.A.R.C. QRP Swap Shop: http://www.halifax-arc.org

PSK Site: http://aintel.bi.ehu.es/psk31.html

QRP ARCI:  http://www.qrparci.org/

AMSAT: http://www.amsat.org/

Radio Habana Cuba: http://www.radiohc.org/

CFARS-Canadian Forces Affiliate Radio System:  http://www.cfars.ca/

S.O.C Radio Club: http://www.qsl.net/soc/

Lakehead Amateur Radio Club (L.A.R.C): http://www.larclub.net/

Salvation Army Team Emergency Network (SATERN): http://www.satern.org/

VE3ONN Web Site (ARES): http://www.thunderbay.emergencyradio.ca/

Railroad Caboose Cars On The Air (R.R.C.C.O.T.A.): http://groups.yahoo.com/group/rrccota/

Railroad Depots On The Air: (R.R.D.O.T.A.): http://groups.yahoo.com/group/rrdota/

Radio Club 72: http://www.club72.su/

RU QRP Club: http://translate.google.ru/translate?hl=en&sl=ru&u=qrp.ru

HB-1A radio Users Group: http://ca.groups.yahoo.com/group/hb1a_radio_users/

Boundary waters Amateur Radio Club (B.W.A.R.C.): http://www.boreal.org/bwarc/

PODXS 070 PSK Club: http://www.podxs070.com/

How To Use an Antenna Tuner: http://www.hamuniverse.com/tuner.html

Ultra DX Home: http://ultradx.com/Home/tabid/83/Default.aspx

 

 

 

Little Thunder QRP Club - VE3LTQ

I hold the callsign for the Little Thunder QRP Club here in Thunder Bay. A few fellow amateurs who enjoy the art of QRP and homebrewing created the club. We are a no bylaws or dues collecting club, we simply meet to talk about various aspects of the QRP hobby. So listen for the club call on the air, and hope to work you soon. The Little Thunder QRP Club now holds the FISTS # 10325, so will be using that from time time in the contests.

You can visit the club website:

Little Thunder QRP Club: http://my.tbaytel.net/flesnick/LittleThunderQRPClub.htm



VA3SBB 10 Meter Propagation Beacon (No longer in service)

However the new call sign of VE3SEC is now being used by myself for my 10 meter propagation testing from Thunder Bay Ontario EN58hh. If you hear VE3SEC on 28.241 please do not hesitate to send your report to.

Fred Lesnick

2060 Hwy 61

Thunder Bay, Ontario Canada

P7J1B9

or email to : flesnick@tbaytel.net or ve3fal@hotmail.com

 

SOME OF THE CLUBS I BELONG TO (VE3FAL)
QRP CANADA #11 MQFD #17   NORTHWEST QRP #493    
ALASKA QRP #382 AMSAT #33629   N.J. QRP #140      
MI QRP #M1610   070 CLUB #355   GQRP #7560      
FISTS #2337   SIX CLUB #176   YLISSB # 15214      
TEN-TEN #58940   SPAR #79   SOC #107      
FP QRP #101   RAC #13958   NAQCC #23        
SKCC #50                    
                     
                     

 

Society For The Preservation of Amateur Radio- http://www.spar-hams.org/

 

PropNET: If the band is open and nobody is transmitting, can anybody hear it?

Welcome to the next level of Amateur wireless innovation. PropNET is an ad-hoc wireless digital network established by experimenters who are excited to explore new frontiers in the invisible world around us.

Participants known as Probes will periodically transmit on an Anchor frequency (see list to the left). Any station that receives that transmission forwards the 'catch' to an Internet server that plots the event on a map hosted by findu (see Map Menu section to the left).

While an Amateur Radio license is required in order to be a transmitting participant (probes), unlicensed individuals are encouraged to participate as receive-only stations (lurkers), reporting what they capture. Click on the hyperlinks above to view real-time maps of participating stations.

Participation requires the use of a Windows-based computer with an available sound-card, a sound-card cable to connect your transceiver to your computer and the PropNetPSK client for your Windows-based computer. See the hyperlinks in the 'Quick Links' section to the left.

Additionally, you may wish to join the PropNET-Online mailing list that is found on YahooGroups.com. By doing so, you will be kept up to date on the project as a whole.

http://www.propnet.org/

This map was from September 24, 2008 and shows all the paths on 30 meters. I am running 25 watts into a dipole, as you can see I am heard by many stations, and I am hearing these stations as well.

This chart shows the stations hearing each other and reports signal and things like offset etc…

Tx Call

Tx Grid

Rx Call

Rx Grid

Distance

band

offset

imd

Time Heard (UTC)

K4RKM

EM85vf

N0OBG

EM48ro

515.5

HG

-0005

-26

04/08/2008 20:16:29

VE3FAL

EN58hh

W3GXT

FM19ol

872.2

HG

-0148

D60

04/08/2008 20:16:25

N0OBG

EM48ro

N0RQ

EM13rg

498.0

HG

+0003

D99

04/08/2008 20:16

N0OBG

EM48ro

W3GXT

FM19ol

739.4

HG

-0154

D80

04/08/2008 20:16

N0OBG

EM48ro

W3ABW

FN20ot

849.5

HG

-0007

D80

04/08/2008 20:16

N0OBG

EM48ro

WA6MTZ

DM14pw

1464.6

HG

-0011

D50

04/08/2008 20:15:59

N0OBG

EM48ro

K4RKM

EM85vf

515.5

HG

+0004

-25

04/08/2008 20:15:58

K5OK

EM13kf

WA6MTZ

DM14pw

1124.6

HG

-0072

D80

04/08/2008 20:15:21

K5OK

EM13kf

N0OBG

EM48ro

522.5

HG

-0062

-25

04/08/2008 20:15:21

K5OK

EM13kf

W3ABW

FN20ot

1333.4

HG

-0068

D60

04/08/2008 20:15:20

W3GXT

FM19ol

EN64db

EN64db

644.6

HG

+0197

D99

04/08/2008 20:14:41

W3GXT

FM19ol

VE3FAL

EN58hh

872.2

HG

+0148

D70

04/08/2008 20:14:41

W3GXT

FM19ol

WE2M

EL99lc

756.1

HG

+0029

-24

04/08/2008 20:14:40

W3GXT

FM19ol

WE2M

EL99lc

756.1

HG

+0029

-20

04/08/2008 20:14:40

What is encoded in the PHG value?

Keyboard PSK31 operators will often exchange information about their stations. Exchanges are often encoded in repetitive “brag files” that include their location, power output, antenna type, etc. PropNET operation encodes much of this same information in the payload, some of it is in the PHG.APRS users will recognize the PHG code concept. In PropNET, however, the code has been expanded to include the number of ID transmissions per hour. PropNET PHG code is actually a PHGDRA/ code (appearing, in order: Power,Height,Gain,Directivity,Rate,Altitude).  The encoding of this information allows PropNET network participants to exchange station-information quickly and efficiently.  The encoding table is shown below:

 

Code>

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

Note

Power

0

1

4

9

16

25

36

49

64

81

1

Height

10

20

40

80

160

320

640

1280

2560

5120

2

Gain

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

3

Az

Omni

NE

E

SE

S

SW

W

NW

N

 

4

Rate

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

5

ASL

10

20

40

80

160

320

640

1280

2560

5120

6

In a typical PSK31 contact, an operator may pack their brag file with information that looks like this: "I am running 25 watts to a 4 element beam at 40 feet here in the high desert of Arizona"  A PropNET participant's station can convey the same information by exchanging "PHG526649" along with a 6-character Maidenhead Grid locator.

Notes:

1: Square root of the TX power.

2: Log2 (H/10), where H is the antenna height above the local average terrain.

3: Antenna gain dBi. If more than 9dBi, use A=10, B=11, C=12 etc.

4: Azimuth of main antenna lobe.

5: Transmissions per hour. If more than 9 per hour, use A=10, B=11, C=12 etc.

6: Log2(h/10), where h is the height of the antenna above sea level.

To "manually" decode the PropNET PHG code, enter it in the webform here: http://www.pearhead.org/PropNET_PHGRA_decoder

Well there is a small primer to PropNet and propagation studies, a techie level up from 10 meter cw beacons for sure.

Thanks to Jeff Steinkamp N7YG for letting me use some of his material for this article and thanks to the PropNet website.

S.K.C.C.  (W.E.S) Weekend Sprint Junk Box Key